Bridget Welsh is Associate Professor at John Cabot University, a Senior Research Associate at NTU, a Senior Associate Fellow THC and a University Fellow of CDU. She analyzes Southeast Asian politics, especially Malaysia, Myanmar, Singapore and Indonesia. She is committed to engagement, fostering mutual understanding and empowerment.
Monthly archive April, 2011

The Myths of S’wak Polls Results

The dust has begun to settle on the 10th Sarawak polls with the BN touting its retention of the two-thirds majority as a victory, while Pakatan Rakyat points to the more than doubling of its seats. This was the most competitive state election in Sarawak’s history and was hard fought by both sides. BN, led...

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Final Countdown in BN ‘Fixed Deposit’ State

The last day of the campaign has started and for the past few days, it has been ratcheted up to fever pitch on both sides. Larger crowds in the towns for the opposition have coincided with extensive, almost frenzied, visits by BN cabinet ministers far and wide throughout the state.’ Make no mistake about this...

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S’wak Polls Fought and Won in Rural Areas

To understand politics in Sarawak, it is important to appreciate the centrality of local dynamics. Traditionally voters turn out in larger numbers for state elections than for the general election. Despite the transformation of this contest into a national litmus test, local politics will continue to shape the results. While this contest is increasingly becoming...

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A Sarawak Spring?

When change rocked the Middle East from Tunisia to Yemen, many were quick to point out that it could not happen in Malaysia. The BN government has a stronger record of governance and, for all of the unevenness of the playing field, holds competitive elections. Yet, as the Sarawak campaign has unfolded, it is increasingly...

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Sweet and Sour Aftermath of S’wak Polls

The Sarawak polls are over and the attention is now on assessing its implications at both the state and national levels. Much attention has focused on predictions for the next general elections, with the range of possible dates moving from a few months to further postponement until 2013. My own view remains that there needs...

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